Yesterday I and twelve other Brandeis Students traveled to Boston to join thousands of others in a protest against the War in Iraq. It was actually quite exciting; we relaxed on the Boston Commons for awhile talking to strangers at various booths, listening to music and rousing speeches. In the afternoon, during the march, we joined up with students from various colleges in the Boston area as well as a large number of High School students and took to the streets.

Though it isn’t a great article, the Boston Globe, covered the event and quoted Innermostparts.org’s’ very own Liza Behrendt:

Liza Behrendt, a sophomore at Brandeis University, weaved through the crowds of antiwar paraphernalia and protesters dressed in a white Haz-Mat jumpsuit with a bright pink peace sign painted on the front and a Sharpie marker taped to the back. Behrendt said her “walking petition” outfit – she collected signatures on her back – was her effort to meet like-minded people outside her student group.
“Even if [the rally] doesn’t make concrete change, it energizes people,” said Behrendt, 19, who was disappointed only 13 students from her school attended. “How can people not be angry?”

I’m pretty angry; and I’m tired of this war. I hope to see more people at the next major demonstration.

2 comments on “Brandeis Activism in the Boston Globe”

  1. Liza Says:

    Although this was a slightly disappointing article, (The photo is lame and there were thousands, not hundreds, at the protest), I’m glad it was covered. I’m especially glad that they covered Carlos Arredondo, a military father with whom a few of us Brandeis kids chatted. He had an incredible story, and we were amazed at the gallant way in which he honored his son’s death: devoting his life to preventing more of the same. People like him remind us why we all must oppose needless war. I encourage everyone to look at this article and photo essay in the Nation detailing Arredondo’s story:

    http://www.thenation.com/doc/20060508/richards

  2. Sahar Says:

    Congrats liza! Glad you all had fun at the protest.